Tag Archives: redwood

Tips & Tricks for Wine Cellars: Mahogany Versus Redwood

One of the first decisions an individual has to make when deciding on a wine rack is what type of wood they want their piece to be constructed from.

At WineRacks.com, we offer three varieties of wood which we stand by. These options are mahogany, pine and oak. Mahogany, though, is the focus of this post.

Often we find potential customers are torn between mahogany or redwood when it comes to deciding on the wood for their wine rack. While both are fine woods, we stand by mahogany for a variety of reasons.

Mahogany is a heavy and very stable hardwood with coloring that varies from almost white to a deep brown. The grain of mahogany is usually straight and slightly lustrous, and the wood is naturally decay and moisture resistant. It is no wonder then that mahogany’s rich coloring and durability make it a popular choice for all types of projects.

In comparison, redwood is softer than mahogany which makes it more prone to denting. Mahogany also takes stain and finish better than most other words including redwood.

Furthermore, the mahogany we offer is sustainably harvested. As a result, trees in these forests are not harvested until they are mature and are mostly heartwood.

This is important not only from an environmental factor but from a builder’s standpoint as well. The reason for this is only the heartwood of a tree is rot resistant. Sap wood, or the outer most layer of a tree, is not rot resistant in any species. As a result, most of the redwood on the market is not as resistant to decay and rot as the mahogany we offer. While some companies do offer the option to purchase premium vertical grain or “All Heart” redwood, it is usually quite expensive. In contrast, our durable and rot resistant mahogany is reasonably priced.

When choosing your wine rack, it is imperative that you consider all of your options before coming to a final decision. Making the wrong decision in your choice of wood could result in wine that has been compromised by the racks holding it or a need to shell out more money in the future to fix a now faulty rack.

We at WineRacks.com stand by our woods and our racks.